Tag Archives: Ely

There’s an Alp for That…

As I began to write this piece on wines from the Alps it struck me that, rather neatly, the topography of the region was as good an analogy as any for the wines it produces.

The Alps are difficult to get to. They’re not easily accessible, a little inconvenient you might say, and a visit there is not everyone’s cup of tea. It’s not cheap either. But for many, the effort is so worth it. Once you taste the Alpine air you can never go back; once you experience the headiness of the snow-capped vistas then many other landscapes pale in comparison.

Likewise, wines from the Alps – be they French, Swiss, Italian or otherwise – share similar characteristics. They’re hard to find, made from varieties you’ve likely never heard of, and often taste like nothing you’ve had before. Whether that’s a good thing or not is – of course – down to personal preference. But to those with a keen curiosity and open mind, they’re a revelation.

I was lucky to be allowed to dip my toe into the world of Alpine wine thanks to a small informal tasting in Ely Wine bar recently, hosted by two fantastic wine importers, Nomad and Tyrrels, who plied their Alpine wares from France and Switzerland respectively.


SWITZERLAND: DOUZE POINTS

You may not have come across Swiss wines here in Ireland before, and likely for good reason. Wines imported into Switzerland were subject to stringent tariffs until the 1990s and finally abolished in 2006; that means that until 10 years ago it was easier and cheaper for the Swiss to buy their own wine rather than Chilean or Australian imports, leaving little left over for the rest of us to enjoy. There simply wasn’t really a need to export.

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The Alps

Other factors conspire against Swiss wine. For one the ownership structure is highly fragmented: the Valais region for example, from where our wines below are sourced, counts 5,137 hectares of vines owned by 22,000 people in 80,000 parcels or plots. That sort of set-up requires a lot of time and effort to pull together commercially-viable quantities of wine, let alone enough to make exporting worthwhile.

Then there’s the geography: the slopes are so steep in places that elaborate monorail systems are needed to transport equipment and grapes. Sometimes they need helicopters. The gradient means that grape picking usually needs to be by hand. And to top it all off the Swiss authorities limit how many grapes each vine can yield. Cheap and easy it ‘aint.

But, like all good things in life, the effort is always worth it. Swiss wines – or at least the ones I tasted that day in Ely – can be electric, exciting and intriguing, not to mention cerebrally stimulating given their history, provenance and hyper-locality.

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The Alps

FRANCE: SAVVY SAVOIE

Comparatively, Alpine France – in particular the Savoie region – has an easier time of it than Switzerland. Yes, their vineyards can be similarly steep and awkward to access, but the gentler run-in from the French side is somewhat easier to manage than the almost persistently elevated nature of the Swiss wine regions.

But oddly, wines were rarely exported from Savoie until recently, a situation similar to Switzerland, but for a very different reason: the dramatic countryside is such a popular, year-round attraction that the constant flow of tourists usually drink the stocks dry.

Savoie has an admirable roll call of local grape varieties rarely found elsewhere, which many attribute to the fact the region only actually became part of France in 1860. For whites they’ve the likes of Jacquère, Altesse, Malvoisie and Mondeuse Blanche; while for reds they’ve Persan and Mondeuse Noire. Nope, I hadn’t heard of any of them before either.

Given the slightly off-piste location and abundance of local varieties, Savoie is riddled with small, passionate, boutique wine producers with many practicing organic or biodynamic principals and old-school winemaking. Many may call them ‘artisan’ or even ‘hipster’ winemakers – in truth they’re just passionate and returning to a more honest and lo-fi way of making wine. Either way, the results are rarely uninteresting.

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THE EU CONVENTION AT ELY

That day in Ely, Irishman Simon Tyrrell held court behind four wines – two white and two red – from Domaine René Favre et Fils of Chamoson in the Valais region of Switzerland, nestled between the borders of France and Italy, run by brothers John & Mike Favre.

To his right was Frenchman Charles Derain of Nomad Wine Importers and in front of him were six wines from Domaine Des Ardoisières, a winery that sources its grapes entirely from only two single vineyard sites in the Vin des Allobroges designation of Savoie: Cevins and St. Pierre de Soucy.

Cevins is perhaps the more notable of the two sites, if not because of its history. The domaine encompasses a steep hill rising above the town which was planted with vines during Roman times, before passing through the hands of Tamié monks and eventually into private ownership. But the infamous phylloxera louse that devastated much of Europe’s vineyards in the mid nineteenth century took its toll here too, and shortly afterwards the two World Wars the country had to contend with spelled the end of winemaking on this awkwardly steep hill.

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But in 1998 a group of enthusiasts began clearing the site and reinstated the old Roman terraces that helped put structured order on the slope. It was a huge effort to unite no less than 400 landowners for an area of less than 10 hectares, an unusual display of selflessness for a common good. They planted mostly the local grape varieties mentioned earlier and farmed using only biodynamic principals, with the first vintage harvested in 2003.

St. Pierre de Soucy, meanwhile, is 50 kms down the valley and a little lower in altitude. This area is farmed organically instead of biodynamically but still provides the clay (or “argile”) soil that so intrigues Domaine Des Ardoisières winemaker Brice Omont.

With the humour and generosity typical of both Charles and Simon, we got to taste through some amazing examples of the region from two fantastic producers; here are a few of my picks…


THREE TO TRY FROM THE SWISS ALPS

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The AlpsDomaine René Favre et Fils, Petite Arvine
€28.95 from Searsons Wine Merchants Monkstown and Donnybrook Fair

Jancis Robinson calls this grape variety “the finest of the indigenous grape specialities of the Valais in Switzerland.” I haven’t tasted any other indigenous white varieties from Switzerland but I do have to say this was damn good. It has a beautiful texture that was almost creamy, despite being tank fermented (maybe some contact with the lees?), followed by a razor sharp, precise acidity and minerality.

A delicious wine and a fantastic experience.

 

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The AlpsDomaine René Favre et Fils, Petite Arvine ‘Grande Année St. Pierre’
€42.95 from Searsons Wine Merchants Monkstown and Donnybrook Fair

And if the Petite Arvine wasn’t good enough, along came its ‘big brother’. Fermented and aged in oak, this was beautiful and Burgundian in style.

Think crisp green apple coated in butter. It was textural, fresh, rich and long, all at once. Transcendental.

 

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The AlpsDomaine René Favre et Fils, Humagne Rouge
€29.95 from Searsons Wine Merchants Monkstown and Donnybrook Fair

Humagne Rouge is a relatively rare variety from Valais which I found to be wild and rustic with its slight vegetal notes (think green pepper) diffusing into smoke and black pepper.

The palate was surprisingly soft and smooth and juicy with nice acidity at the end. Again another fantastic experience if you’re keen to try obscure grape varieties.

 

THREE TO TRY FROM THE FRENCH ALPS

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The AlpsDomaine des Ardoisières, St Pierre de Soucy, “Argile” Blanc
€30 from Mitchell & Son, Blackrock Cellar, 64wine and Jus de Vine

A blend of 40% Jacquère, 30% Chardonnay & 30% Mondeuse Blanche.

This is beautifully crisp and clean and pure, though for me there was also an interesting, slightly funky, earthy undertone – call it terroir if you will.

 

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The AlpsDomaine des Ardoisières, Cevins, “Schiste” Blanc
€50 from select off-licences

A blend of 40% Jacquère, 30% Roussanne & 30% Malvasia. A wilder wine with fennel, yellow apple and artichoke aromas. Again a feral note but much more noticeable this time.

Fresh and lively, its acidity is razor-sharp but it all softens to a slightly buttery finish from its time in barrel. A remarkable wine.

 

The Hills are Alive With the Taste of Wines from The AlpsDomaine des Ardoisières, St Pierre de Soucy, “Argile” Rouge
€30 from Mitchell & Son, Blackrock Cellar, 64Wine and Jus de Vine

A blend of 80% Gamay (Beaujolais is just 50kms away after all) and 20% of the local Persan grape. A very characterful wine, light but complex, bursting with juicy fruit and a very distinct twist of black pepper.

Black forest fruit and black cherry abound, and it has a slightly bitter, dry twist at the end. Wonderful.

 

This article originally appeared on TheTaste.ie.

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French Double-Whammy at Ely this September

In one of my earliest posts I waxed lyrical about an initiative that the ever-excellent ely wine bars were running whereby you could enjoy one of two incredible bottles of wine in ely’s cosy Ely Place home for close to the same price you could buy them in the shops.

But why not just buy it in the shop then? Well, throw in the service, excellent glassware and atmosphere of ely, along with the opportunity to grab a really delicious bite to eat there too, then you’re practically making money with the offer.

Well, I was delighted to see that ely are again offering two outstanding wines at silly prices: the sumptuous Les Héritiers du Comte Lafon Mâcon ‘Milly Lamartine’ from Burgundy for €49 and La Reserve de Léoville Barton from St. Julien in Bordeaux for just €59.

Given that the La Reserve de Léoville Barton is €50 retail, for example, then €59 in a wine bar – especially one like ely – is a downright bargain. What’s more, the glass price – €14.75 – is exactly a quarter of the full bottle price, another big thumbs up.

Very highly recommended. I mean, just look at them!

Credit: @elywinebars on Twitter
But Wait! There’s More!

ely is on the Léoville Barton buzz it seems: on Tuesday 13th September they’re hosting what can only be described as a decadently old-school Bordeaux dinner featuring Châteaux Léoville & Langoa Barton and Château Coutet.

I won’t get to go myself but it’s something I would have loved to attend, and it would unmissable for any wine lover. And at the time of writing there’s still a handful of seats available too, but they’re sure to disappear sharpish over the weekend.

The price seems hefty at €110, but some really incredible wines will be served along with ely’s always-outstanding food; put it this way: knowing ely, you won’t be found wanting by the end of it.

Credit: @IBrosnan on Twitter

Here’s the full blurb:

ely wine bar on Ely Place welcomes world-renowned wine producers to Dublin this September, with an exclusive wine dinner with Château Léoville Barton, Château Langoa Barton and Château Coutet on September 13th.

Join Lilian Barton-Sartorius of Château Langoa and Château Léoville-Barton, along with Aline Baly from Château Coutet, the outstanding Barsac estate, as they introduce a selection of their magnificent wines on the night. Beginning with an apéritif from Château Coutet, guests will then sample four reds from Château Léoville Barton and Château Langoa Barton throughout the meal, finishing with a spectacular 1997 Château Coutet.

Great wine calls for great food and ely wine bar executive head chef Ryan Stringer has created a menu which includes organic meats from the family farm in the Burren, designed to fully complement the wines being enjoyed at this celebratory dinner.

Representing some of the most highly regarded Irish ‘Wine Geese’, the Irish connections of Château Léoville Barton and Château Langoa Barton stretch right back into the Fermanagh of the 1700s, the birthplace of Thomas Barton. Initially establishing his wine broking business in Bordeaux, Thomas’ grandson Hugh began the development of the estate as it is today, beginning with the purchase of Château Langoa in 1826 and later adding the Léoville estate.

Current owner Antony Barton was born in Straffan in 1930 and inherited the estate in 1983. He continues to run Château Léoville Barton and Châteaux Langoa with his daughter Lilian, with worldwide recognition for making some of the most exciting and scintillating wines in the St. Julien appellation.

25 miles southeast of the city of Bordeaux on the left bank, Château Coutet is one of the oldest Sauternes producing vineyards, whose sensational elegant golden wines were also added to by a first-of-its kind dry white wine from Barsac in 2010, produced in limited quantities from the heart of this Premier Grand Cru.

Whether you know and love these wines already or want to expand your wine knowledge, the Châteaux Léoville & Langoa Barton and Château Coutet dinner at ely promises to be a relaxed and informative evening of outstanding wines and excellent food.

Tickets cost €110 per person with limited spaces available. For more information or to make a booking contact 01 6787867 or visit http://www.elywinebar.com.

A Busy Week for Wine in Ireland

The coming week (and a bit) is proving to be something of a purple patch for lovers of wine in Ireland.

Tonight (Thursday 29th October) is the inaugural edition of SPIT, a day-long event that showcases five of Ireland’s best small wine importers: WineMason, Vinostito, Tyrrells, GrapeCircus, and Nomad.

It’ll be held in the gorgeous Smock Alley Theatre, with the public session starting at 18.30 and tickets a mere €25pp – for the quality, breadth and range of wines on offer, that’s actually a bargain. For more see here.

Yours truly will be at the Bloggers’ Table with Paddy of The Vine Inspiration,  where we’ll have some of our picks from the evening on tasting. Trust me: it was an incredible difficult decision to choose just a few wines from the hundreds of gorgeous bottles on show at the event.

Click here to read more about SPIT, or better yet pop down to Smock Alley tonight and just go.

 

Then next week we have a fantastic double-whammy in the form of Rhône Wine Week Ireland and International Sherry Week Dublin. Spoiled for choice doesn’t even cover it: both event are run by those most passionate about the subjects and I’m sure that every event will be really excellent. Below is a quick run-down of what’s on where:

 

Rhône Wine Week Ireland 2015

Always a fantastic week of wine, immaculately organised by Tyrrells, who themselves are the undisputed experts of the Rhône in Ireland.

DUBLIN: Monday 2nd November, 17.30
The ever-popular Big Rhône Quiz takes place once again – more info here

DUBLIN: Monday 2nd November, 18.30
Domaine de Mourchon will have a wine tasting at the IFI before a screening of Jacques Audiard’s Read My Lips.  €25pp. More info here.

DUBLIN: Monday 2nd November
L’Gueuleton will host a dinner with Etienne Defosse from Delas. €35pp. For more information contact l’Gueuleton on 01 6753708.

CORK: Tuesday 3rd November
L’Atitude 51 in Cork city will host an evening with Jean Louis from Famille Quoit. To book please call 021 239 0219 or email info@latitude51.ie.

DUBLIN: Wednesday 4th November, 18.00
*Highly Recommended* – if there’s only one event you can make this week, make it ely‘s excellent Big Rhône Tasting. €15pp. For more click here.

DUBLIN: Thursday 5th November
Hatch & Sons host wine heavyweights John Wilson and Mary Dowey as they join winemakers Denis Deschamps of Les Vignerons d’Estezargues and Thomas Schmittel of Domaine Graillot for a 3 course meal including wines. €35pp. for more info and to book please email hatchandsons1@gmail.com or call 01 661 0075.

DUBLIN: Thursday 5th November, 19.30
Mitchell & Son will be at the Fitzwilliam Lawn Tennis Club with Christophe Jaume of Domaine Grand Veneur for a four course wine dinner. €65pp. For more click here.

LIMERICK: Friday 6th November, 17.00
There’ll be an open tasting of Rhône wines at The Wine Room in Limerick’s boutique One Pery Square.

 

International Sherry Week Dublin 2015

DUBLIN: Tuesday 3rd November, 18.30
Stanley’s Wine Director Morgan VanderKamer and Sherry Educator Paddy Murphy host a “Four Sherries, One Vineyard” tasting. More info here.

CORK: Wednesday 4th November, 15:30
Sherry talk and tasting at the famous Ballymaloe Cookery School. More here.

DUBLIN: Wednesday 4th November, 18.30
Stanley’s Restaurant is the epicentre of sherry once again, and on Wednesday they’ll hold a tasting of Fernando de Castilla’s Antique range. More here.

DUBLIN: Thursday 5th November, 17.00
Taste through the many styles from Bodegas Tradicion in Stanley’s. More here.

DUBLIN: Friday 6th November, 17.00
After all the sherry talks and tastings during the week, it’s time to flaunt your own: Stanley’s will host an innovative ‘Bring Your Own’ evening where all bottles brought on the night will be available for sampling. More here.

 

Six of the Best Wine Bars in Dublin’s City Centre

Last week the Irish travel website Get Real Irish Tours posted a piece by me where I gave my six favourite wine bars in Dublin’s city centre. I’m re-posting here to give it a second airing, mostly to benefit those who may have missed it first time around, but also maybe perhaps breaking a blog drought in the process (ahem).

Where’s your favourite place? Leave your opinions in the comment section below.

 


 

Ely

The original Ely, located on (and named after) Ely Place just off St. Stephen’s Green, was established in 1999 by Erik and Michelle Robson, whose vision was for a wine bar in the continental style complemented by thoughtful, slow-cooked food with meats supplied by the family farm in Co. Clare in the west of Ireland. The wine, in other words, came first, with food provided to complement it – a concept generally unheard of in Ireland to that point.

Sixteen years later, Ely has firmly established itself as the most prominent wine destination in Dublin. With two locations in Dublin – one either side of the River Liffey – they offer focused wine evenings, cookery classes and even a cook book, not to mention consistently winning enough awards to constantly worry their mantelpiece.

Combine this with an manifesto issued in 2014 declaring a shake-up of their pricing policy to make fine wines more affordable to the consumer, and it’s easy to see how this stalwart of the Irish wine scene has become a byword for all that is good with wine in Dublin.

Ely Wine Bars
22 Ely Place, Dublin 2. 01 676 8986
CHQ, IFSC, Dublin 1. 01 672 0010 


 

Fallon & Byrne

Fallon & Byrne broke new ground in 2006 when they opened their large, airy, New York-style emporium of luxury food in Dublin’s city centre, the first of its kind ever seen on this scale in Ireland.

Situated in the former Telephone Exchange building in Exchequer Street, on the ground floor they have a fine food market, deli, fishmonger, butcher, cheesemonger and café; a restaurant on the first floor; and a wine bar – as is de rigueur nowadays – in the basement.

The wine bar really made a name for itself by introducing “Happy Mondays”, which gave wine-loving Dubliners the opportunity to enjoy any bottle off their shelves for a measly €1 corkage (usual price €10) – all supplemented, of course, by Fallon & Byrne’s tasty menu of nibbles, sharing platters, and more substantial fare.

Fallon & Byrne
11-17 Exchequer Street, Dublin 2
01 472 1010 


 

Olesya’s

Literally across the street from Fallon & Byrne, this cosy little spot is great all year round, but really comes into its own on the (rare) warm evenings in Dublin when Olesya’s can fling open their large street front windows to provide a truly continental, almost al fresco experience.

The list is impressively expansive with the by-the-glass offerings changing regularly, and those a little less confident in their wine knowledge can rest easy here thanks to concise descriptions of what can be expected from each bottle.

Like other winebars, Olesya’s offers a tasty menu to accompany their wines, but for me their charcuterie boards are the real draw. This writer has more than once been felled by the enormity of their Deluxe Platter, a veritable smorgasbord of cheeses, meats and other accoutrements that can be a struggle to finish, even when shared. Other offerings of note is the Seafood Platter which has a distinctly Russian theme to it, a nod to the Siberian homeland of its owner Olesya Mylnikova, containing pickled vegetables and cured seafood.

With monthly wine masterclasses based around specific themes and live jazz on most Wednesday evenings from 7pm, this quirky little spot has a great ‘neighbourhood wine bar’ feel to it, albeit slap bang in Dublin’s city centre.

Olesya’s Wine Bar
18 Exchequer Street, Dublin
(01) 672 4087


 

KC Peaches Wine Cave

Don’t let the name scare you, this is more cosy basement than cold cave. Katie Cantwell – the “KC” of her eponymous chain – opened her first outlet on Pearse Street in 2006 offering mountains of healthy fresh salads and hot food, mixed-and-matched to your liking and sold by the plate.

Nine years later and there are now four KC Peaches in Dublin’s city centre, with this Nassau Street location offering its own wine-lover’s hideaway. In keeping with the wholefood philosophy of their food businesses their wine selection offers a large number of organic and biodynamic offerings, which of course can be enjoyed with some hearty, mindfully curated food and live music on Friday and Saturday evenings.

Though in existence for a couple of years now, the room and wine list have both been revamped of late, offering a new and exciting alternative to getting your wine fix in Dublin’s city centre. That is, of course, if you can make it past the mounds of incredible baked goods stacked enticingly in the window of the entrance.

KC Peaches
28-29 Nassau Street, Dublin 2
0 1 633 6872


 

Bagots Hutton

Located slap bang in what is colloquially known as the “Hipster Triangle” of Dublin, Bagots Hutton – named after the wine merchant trading from that exact location from 1829 to the 1980’s – offers a wine experience infused with a design aesthetic befitting the area.

But don’t expect form over function here: this is a luxuriously cosy space full of soft leather sofas and candlelight, a carefully curated wine list and a notable and diverse food menu. It’s a mish-mash of offerings, and that’s just how they like it: from casual passing trade in the front during the day, to cosy social wine hangout in the back in the evenings, right the way through to hopping venue at the weekends, this is a chameleon of a bar but one that always has wine and food as its premise.

What’s more they like to mix things up, with an “Aperitivo Hour” every day, then “Meaty Mondays” and “Cheesy Tuesdays” where you get a free meat or cheese board with your bottle of wine respectively. Something for everyone in the heart of the hottest area in Dublin – what’s not to like?

Bagots Hutton Wine Emporium
28 William Street South, Dublin 2
01 534 3956


 

Stanley’s

Technically more of a restaurant than a stand-alone wine bar – though the ground floor of this location would fit that description nicely – the newly opened Stanley’s gets a notable mention here given its conscientious and reverential approach to wine.

In addition to a carefully curated selection of interesting and original wines available by the glass, there’s a sizeable and varied set of sweet/fortified wines, an entirely separate list dedicated solely to “The Wonderful World of Sherry” and even an innovative “Skin Contact Wine Flight” offering an introduction to white wines made using ancient methods.

Not only that, but Stanley’s Wine Director, Morgan Vanderkamer, holds regular wine club events and winemaker dinners, taking this passion for grape well beyond their impeccable list. You won’t find your run-of-the-mill Pinot Grigio or Sauvignon Blanc here, and Dublin is all the better for it.

Stanley’s Restaurant & Wine Bar
7 Saint Andrew’s Street, Dublin 2
01 485 3273

Ely Elation

An email pinged into my inbox yesterday from Ely announcing another pair of fantastic fine wine offerings at their Ely Place heartland, and again it was so good I had to rush out to take advantage.

[singlepic id=26 w=320 h=240 float=left]On offer was (and is) the Réserve de Léoville Barton 2008 from St-Julien in Bordeaux and the Domaine Christophe Bonnefond ‘Côte Rozier’ 2007 from Côte Rôtie in the Rhône, both for €59 a bottle or, even more attractively, €15 per glass.

Yes I know what you’re thinking: for €15 you could get an entire bottle of very decent wine in an off-licence, so why  in God’s name would you opt for only a glass – i.e. a quarter of a bottle – for the same outlay?

Consider, then, that both the Reserve de Léoville Barton and Côte Rozier are normally €40 from the excellent wine merchants Tindals and Tyrrels respectively. This is the off-trade pricing though, so using the rule of thumb of at least doubling that cost to get the on-trade price then this wine should cost at least €80, but more likely €90-€100, in a wine bar. So instead of paying €20-€25 for a glass of each I was paying €15, so this was like a Brown Thomas sale in terms of pricing: sure it’s still expensive, but given the quality, the rarity and the price relative to what it should be then it’s a bargain.

Luckily I had my eternally patient fiancée with me so I could get to try both wines in one sitting. First up for me was the Réserve de Léoville Barton 2008, which is the ‘second wine’ of the famed Léoville Barton, a Second Growth Bordeaux in St-Julien.

Estates in Bordeaux bottle their flagship wines, or ‘grand vin’ under the name of their estate or château, but oftentimes quality control is so stringent that there can be enough grapes left over to make what they call a ‘second wine’ which, though not as good as the grand vin, is nevertheless still of very high quality.

Remember that the painstakingly pedantic work that goes into managing the entire vineyard over the course of the year applies to all the grapes, and so really the ‘second wine’ is only established at the final stages; as such you get something quite similar to the top wine but for a fraction of the cost, and it’s a perfect introduction to the top-level estate offering. If the wine world had its own version of the Kildare Outlet Centre then you’d be sure that’s where the ‘second wines’ would hang out.

[singlepic id=24 w=320 h=240 float=right]So back to Léoville Barton. You might guess that the name isn’t fully French, and you’d be right. The Barton family have their roots in Straffan, Co Kildare, and still maintain an estate there to this day. In 1826 Hugh Barton, then owner of Château Langoa Barton in St-Julien, bought a part of the large Léoville estate next door and created Château Léoville Barton there. Since then it has become a Second Growth, one of only fifteen properties that sit just below the top tier of Bordeaux wines, which itself only has five properties in total. So the Irish done good, you could say.

And so what about the Réserve de Léoville Barton 2008? I could smell it as soon as the waiter began placing it on the table. An intoxicating, complex scent of cedar, oak, blackcurrant, some spice – I could have nosed it for hours. The palate was delicious and lighter than expected, gorgeous but perhaps not as long as I’d imagined. It was then that I realised that this was my first taste of ‘real’ Bordeaux, and I have to say I’m hooked. I’ll be back for more for definite.

[singlepic id=25 w=320 h=240 float=left]What then about the Domaine Christophe Bonnefond ‘Côte Rozier’ 2007? Again, Côte Rôtie is one of those fabled regions that is renowned for its fine wines, and never comes cheap. They only grow Syrah, which is Shiraz under a different name. But whereas the Shiraz we’re more familiar with – the Australian version – can be big, hot and spicy, Syrah from the Northern Rhône is a much more complex and subtle affair. And so it was with the Côte Rozier, which surprised me by being showing some aged Burgundy characteristics: leather, tobacco, white pepper; and again the palate wasn’t as heavy as I imagined.

Ely have to be commended for continually giving the general public the opportunity to try some genuinely fine and rare wines. In terms of wine in Dublin they set the bar years back and continue to be the benchmark today; not everyone has the guts to offer €59 wines as ‘specials’, but they can because they know what they’re doing and they do it well. Congrats all round.